Becoming a Plumber

In today’s competitive job market, plumbing is a profession worth looking into. The construction industry as a whole has seen a recent interest, often from white collar professionals who have found that doing something with their hands is vastly underrated.

As a construction worker, you can go home at the end of the day having bettered someone’s living condition, and make good money doing it. Plumbers in particular fulfill a basic need for inside water availability.

Whether you are a computer programmer or a middle school student, if you are considering joining the army of plumbers across America, following a few basic steps can increase your chances of furthering your career.

1. High School Diploma

A diploma or GED will take you far in this industry. Plumbers tend to do a good bit of math, so pay attention to your math scores on your ACT or GED. The better you appear to potential employers, the quicker you will move through the ranks.

2. Union Memberships and Apprenticeships

Not all states have unions, but those that do often rely heavily on them. Unions provide networking opportunities and sometimes specific classes. Becoming a plumber’s assistant may not require intense training, but the more you have, the better your resume will look. Apprenticeships are also an option, especially if you are still in school. This is an opportunity to learn and prove yourself without dealing with high expectations. The pay may not be great, but take the experience now and the money is likely to follow.

3. Personal Integrity

The importance of personal integrity is commonly underestimated. Don’t make that mistake. In the construction industry, being respected and trusted can be more beneficial to you than having years of experience. And if you put your will into the work and do a good job, people will remember it.

4. Research the Requirements of Your State

Every state is a little different. Are hours in the field required? A license? An exam? Make sure you know what your state wants out of a professional plumber. You don’t have to do it all at once, but it’s always good to keep the end goal in sight.

5. Business Sense

Bonus points if you have good business sense. Lots of plumbing companies tend to be small and self-sufficient, and there may not be much room for expansion for you. Owning your own business, however, can be a dream come true. To do this, you will need to know a few things about the industry, business as a whole, and even a little accounting. Plumbing alone won’t make you a self-employed plumber. But keeping up with the newest laws and tools can go a long way toward expanding your options.

The construction world can be rewarding, and plumbing as a profession could serve you well through the years. Don’t be discouraged by job-hunting statistics. With some experience and a little intentional planning, you could be the CEO of the next national plumbing franchise.

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